Frontoparietal and salience network alterations in obsessive–compulsive disorder: insights from independent component and sliding time window analyses

Frontoparietal and salience network alterations in obsessive–compulsive disorder: insights from independent component and sliding time window analyses

J Psychiatry Neurosci 2020;45(3):214-221 | PDF | Appendix

Deniz A. Gürsel, PhD*; Lena Reinholz, MSc*; Benno Bremer; Benita Schmitz-Koep, MD; Nicolai Franzmeier, PhD; Mihai Avram, PhD†; Kathrin Koch, PhD†

Background: Resting-state functional MRI (fMRI) studies commonly report alterations in 3 core networks in obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD) — the frontoparietal network, the default mode network and the salience network — defined by functionally connected infraslow oscillations in ongoing brain activity. However, most of these studies observed static functional connectivity in the brains of patients with OCD.

Methods: To investigate dynamic functional connectivity alterations and widen the evidence base toward the triple network model in OCD, we performed group-based independent component and sliding time window analyses in 49 patients with OCD and 41 healthy controls.

Results: The traditional independent component analysis showed alterations in the left frontoparietal network as well as between the left and right frontoparietal networks in patients with OCD compared with healthy controls. For dynamic functional connectivity, the sliding time window approach revealed peak dysconnectivity between the left and right frontoparietal networks and between the left frontoparietal network and the salience network.

Limitations: The number of independent components, noise in the resting-state fMRI images, the heterogeneity of the OCD sample, and comorbidities and medication status in the patients could have biased the results.

Conclusion: Disrupted modulation of these intrinsic brain networks may contribute to the pathophysiology of OCD.


*These authors share first authorship.

†These authors share senior authorship.

Submitted Feb. 19, 2019; Revised Aug. 7, 2019; Accepted Sep. 27, 2019; Published online Mar. 13, 2020

Acknowledgements: This study was supported by a Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) grant to K. Koch (KO 3744/7-1).

Affiliations: From the Department of Neuroradiology, Technical University of Munich, School of Medicine, Munich, Germany (Gürsel, Bremer, Schmitz-Koep, Avram, Koch); the TUM-Neuroimaging Center (TUM-NIC), Technical University of Munich, Munich, Germany (Gürsel, Avram); the Department of Psychology, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Munich, Germany (Reinholz); and the Institute for Stroke and Dementia Research, Klinikum der Universität München, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität LMU, Munich, Germany (Franzmeier).

Competing interests: None declared.

Contributors: D. Gürsel, L. Reinholz and K. Koch designed the study. D. Gürsel, L. Reinholz, B. Bremer and B. Schmitz-Koep acquired the data, which D. Gürsel, L. Reinholz, N. Franzmeier, M. Avram and K. Koch analyzed. D. Gürsel and M. Avram wrote the article, which all authors reviewed. All authors approved the final version to be published and can certify that no other individuals not listed as authors have made substantial contributions to the paper.

DOI: 10.1503/jpn.190038

Correspondence to: K. Koch, Department of Neuroradiology and TUM Neuroimaging Center, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Ismaninger Strasse 22, 81675 Munich, Germany; kathrin.koch@tum.de