Immediate effects of risperidone on cerebral activity in healthy subjects: a comparison with subjects with first-episode schizophrenia

Immediate effects of risperidone on cerebral activity in healthy subjects: a comparison with subjects with first-episode schizophrenia

PDF

J Psychiatry Neurosci 2004;29(1):30-37

Carol J. Lane, PhD; Elton T.C. Ngan, MD; Lakshmi N. Yatham, MBBS; Tom J. Ruth, PhD; Peter F. Liddle, BMBCh, PhD

Lane, Ngan, Yatham — Department of Psychiatry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC; Ruth — TRIUMF Positron Emission Tomography program, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC; Liddle — Division of Psychiatry, University of Nottingham, Queens Medical Centre, Nottingham, UK.

Abstract

Objective: To test the hypothesis that administration of risperidone to healthy subjects produces reductions in metabolism in the frontal cortex similar to those produced by administration of risperidone to patients experiencing a first episode of schizophrenia.

Methods: Positron emission tomography was used to measure the changes in regional metabolism produced by a single 2-mg dose of risperidone and by placebo, administered under randomized, double-blind conditions, in 9 healthy subjects. Conjunction analysis was used to identify those cerebral sites where changes in metabolism in the healthy subjects coincided with similar changes in metabolism observed in patients with schizophrenia.

Results: Compared with placebo, risperidone produced reductions in metabolism in the left lateral frontal cortex and right medial frontal cortex in healthy subjects. Conjunction analysis revealed that these changes occurred at locations similar to the loci of change produced by risperidone in patients with schizophrenia.

Conclusion: Because the reduction in metabolism in the medial frontal cortex produced by risperidone is associated with alleviation of positive symptoms in patients with schizophrenia, the observation of a reduction in metabolism at a similar site in healthy subjects supports the hypothesis that the antipsychotic effect of risperidone arises, at least in part, from a physiologic effect that occurs in both patients with schizophrenia and healthy subjects.

Résumé

Objectif : Vérifier l’hypothèse selon laquelle l’administration de rispéridone à des sujets en bonne santé provoque, dans le cortex frontal, des baisses du métabolisme semblables à celles que produit l’administration de rispéridone à des patients victimes d’une première crise de schizophrénie.

Méthodes : On a utilisé la tomographie par émission de positrons pour mesurer les changements du métabolisme régional produits par une seule dose de 2 mg de rispéridone et par un placebo, administrée à neuf sujets en bonne santé dans des conditions randomisées et à double insu. On a eu recours à l’analyse de corrélation pour identifier les sites du cerveau où des changements du métabolisme chez les sujets en bonne santé ont coïncidé avec des changements semblables du métabolisme observés chez des patients atteints de schizophrénie.

Résultats : Comparativement au placebo, la rispéridone a produit des réductions du métabolisme dans le cortex frontal latéral gauche et le cortex frontal interne droit chez les sujets en bonne santé. L’analyse de corrélation a révélé que ces changements se produisaient à des endroits semblables à ceux des changements provoqués par la rispéridone administrée à des patients atteints de schizophrénie.

Conclusion : Comme il y a un lien entre la réduction du métabolisme dans le cortex frontal interne que produit la rispéridone et l’atténuation des symptômes positifs chez les patients atteints de schizophrénie, l’observation d’une baisse du métabolisme à un endroit semblable chez des sujets en bonne santé appuie l’hypothèse selon laquelle l’effet antipsychotique de la rispéridone découle, du moins en partie, d’un effet physiologique qui se produit à la fois chez les patients atteints de schizophrénie et chez les sujets en bonne santé.


Medical subject headings: antipsychotic agents; risperidone; schizophrenia; tomography, emission-computed.

Submitted Oct. 25, 2002; Revised May 13, 2003; Accepted May 21, 2003

Acknowledgements: This study was supported by a grant from the Norma Calder Foundation. We gratefully acknowledge the assistance of the technical staff of the TRIUMF PET program. The TRIUMF PET program receives funding from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research and the National Research Council of Canada.

Competing interests: None declared for Dr. Ngan and Dr. Ruth. Dr. Yatham is on the advisory board of Janssen and has received speaker fees from them. Dr. Lane was employed by Janssen after completion of this manuscript and her PhD. Dr. Liddle has received a speaker fee from AstraZeneca and a meeting chairman fee from Eli Lilly.

Correspondence to: Dr. Peter F. Liddle, Division of Psychiatry, University of Nottingham, Queens Medical Centre, Nottingham NG7 2UH, UK; fax 0115 970-9495; peter.liddle@nottingham.ac.uk