Should cognitive deficit be a diagnostic criterion for schizophrenia?

Should cognitive deficit be a diagnostic criterion for schizophrenia?

PDF

J Psychiatry Neurosci 2004;29(2):102-113

Ralph Lewis, MD

Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, and Division of Youth Psychiatry, Sunnybrook and Women’s College
Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ont.

Abstract

This review examines the question of whether cognitive deficits in schizophrenia are sufficiently reliable, stable and specific to warrant inclusion in the diagnostic criteria for schizophrenia. The literature provides evidence that cognitive deficits are highly prevalent and fairly marked in adult patients with schizophrenia. Similar deficits have been found in children and adolescents with schizophrenia, and in children before they exhibit the signs and symptoms of schizophrenia. These deficits may in fact be central to the pathophysiology underlying the development of overt psychosis in schizophrenia. The deficits appear to be relatively stable across the course of the illness. They are generally more severe in schizophrenia than in affective disorders and may have a relatively specific pattern in schizophrenia. It is concluded that the evidence that cognitive deficits are a core feature of schizophrenia is sufficiently compelling to warrant inclusion of these deficits in the diagnostic criteria for schizophrenia, at least as a nonessential criterion.

Résumé

Cette étude a cherché à savoir si les déficits cognitifs de la schizophrénie sont suffisamment fiables, stables et spécifiques pour justifier de les inclure dans les critères de diagnostic de cette maladie. La littérature scientifique présente des données probantes indiquant que les déficits cognitifs sont très prévalents et assez marqués chez les patients adultes atteints de schizophrénie. On a constaté des déficits semblables chez les enfants et les adolescents atteints de schizophrénie, ainsi que chez les enfants avant l’apparition des signes et des symptômes de la schizophrénie. Ces déficits peuvent en fait jouer un rôle central dans la pathophysiologie sous-tendant l’apparition de la psychose apparente dans les cas de schizophrénie. Les déficits semblent relativement stables pendant toute l’évolution de la maladie. Ils sont en général plus prévalents dans les cas de schizophrénie que dans les cas de troubles affectifs et peuvent se présenter sous une forme relativement spécifique dans la schizophrénie. On conclut que les données probantes indiquant que les déficits cognitifs constituent une caractéristique fondamentale de la schizophrénie sont suffisamment convaincantes pour justifier d’inclure ces déficits dans les critères de diagnostic de la schizophrénie, au moins comme critère non essentiel.


Medical subject headings: adolescent; bipolar disorder; child; cognition; diagnosis; psychotic disorders; schizophrenia.

Submitted Feb. 5, 2003; Revised July 25, 2003; Accepted Aug. 5, 2003

Acknowledgements: The author gratefully acknowledges the role of Dr. Anthony Levitt in providing valuable suggestions for editing the document. The author was supported by funding from the Sunnybrook Trust for Medical Research and from the Koerner Trust Fund through Sunnybrook and Women’s.

Competing interests: None declared.

Correspondence to: Dr. Ralph Lewis, Division of Youth Psychiatry, Sunnybrook and Women’s College Health Sciences Centre, 2075 Bayview Ave., Rm. FG 62, Toronto ON M4N 3M5; fax 416 480-6818; ralph.lewis@utoronto.ca