Microstructural thalamic changes in schizophrenia: a combined anatomic and diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging study

Microstructural thalamic changes in schizophrenia: a combined anatomic and diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging study

PDF

J Psychiatry Neurosci 2008;33(5):440–8

Nivedita Agarwal, MD; Gianluca Rambaldelli, MS; Cinzia Perlini, PsychD; Nicola Dusi, MD; Omer Kitis, MD; Marcella Bellani, MD; Roberto Cerini, MD; Miriam Isola, PhD; Amelia Versace, MD; Matteo Balestrieri, MD, PhD; Anna Gasparini, MD; Roberto Pozzi Mucelli, MD; Michele Tansella, MD; Paolo Brambilla, MD, PhD

Agarwal — Department of Medical and Morphological Research, Section of Radiology, University of Udine, Udine, Italy; Agarwal, Balestrieri, Brambilla — Verona–Udine Brain Imaging and Neuropsychology Program, Inter-University Centre for Behavioural Neurosciences, University of Udine, Udine, Italy; Rambaldelli, Perlini, Dusi, Bellani, Versace, Tansella — Verona–Udine Brain Imaging and Neuropsychology Program, Inter-University Centre for Behavioural Neurosciences, and the Department of Medicine and Public Health, Section of Psychiatry and Clinical Psychology, University of Verona, Verona, Italy; Kitis, Gasparini — Department of Radiology, Section of Neuroradiology, Ege University School of Medicine, Bornova Izmir, Turkey; Cerini — Service of Radiology, Policlinico GB Rossi Hospital, Verona, Italy; Isola — Section of Statistics, Department of Medical and Morphological Research, University of Udine, Udine, Italy; Balestrieri, Brambilla — Department of Pathology and Experimental & Clinical Medicine, Section of Psychiatry, University of Udine, Udine, Italy; Pozzi Mucelli — Department of Morphological and Biomedical Sciences, Section of Radiology, University of Verona, Verona, Italy; Brambilla — Scientific Institute, IRCCS “E. Medea’, Udine, Italy, and 10CERT-BD, Department of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC

Abstract

Objective: Several magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and postmortem studies have supported the role of the thalamus in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Interestingly, a recent small diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) study showed abnormal thalamic microstructure in patients with schizophrenia. The objective of our study was to use structural MRI and DWI to explore for the first time both thalamic volumes and integrity in schizophrenia.

Methods: We measured thalamic volumes and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measures bilaterally in 71 patients with schizophrenia, representative of those living in the geographically defined catchment area of South Verona (i.e., 100 000 inhabitants), and 75 individuals without schizophrenia. The presence of the adhesio interthalamica was also detected.

Results: We found no significant differences in thalamus size between patients with schizophrenia and participants in the control group, with only a trend for decreased left volumes. No abnormal frequency of the adhesio interthalamica was found. In contrast, significantly increased thalamic ADC values were shown in schizophrenia patients. Age significantly inversely correlated with thalamic volumes in both groups and correlated positively with posterior ADCs in patients with schizophrenia. No significant associations between clinical variables and either volumes or ADC values were reported.

Conclusion: Widespread altered microstructure integrity and partially preserved thalamus size were found in schizophrenia patients. Therefore, subtle thalamic structural abnormalities are present in schizophrenia, even with maintained volumes. This may result from disruption at the cytoarchitecture level, ultimately supporting corticothalamic misconnection. Future imaging studies should further explore thalamic tissue coherence and its role for cognitive disturbances in patients at high risk for schizophrenia and in first-degree relatives.

Résumé

Objectif : Plusieurs études fondées sur l’imagerie par résonance magnétique (IRM) et postmortem appuient le rôle du thalamus dans la pathophysiologie de la schizophrénie. Fait intéressant à souligner, une récente étude d’envergure modeste, fondée sur l’imagerie pondérée en diffusion, a démontré une anomalie de la microstructure du thalamus chez les patients atteints de schizophrénie. Notre étude avait pour objectif d’utiliser l’IRM et l’imagerie pondérée en diffusion en vue d’explorer pour la première fois les volumes thalamiques et leur intégrité dans la schizophrénie.

Méthodes : Nous avons mesuré les volumes thalamiques et les valeurs du coefficient de diffusion apparente (CDA) des 2 côtés chez 71 patients atteints de schizophrénie, représentatifs des gens qui vivent dans le secteur géographiquement défini de la partie sud de Vérone (c.-à-d. 100 000 habitants), et 75 individus non atteints de schizophrénie. La présence de l’adhérence interthalamique a également été recherchée.

Résultats : Nous n’avons pas trouvé de différences significatives de la taille du thalamus entre les patients atteints de schizophrénie et les participants témoins, si ce n’est une diminution du volume du thalamus du côté gauche en général. Nous n’avons pas trouvé de fréquence anormale de l’adhérence interthalamique. En revanche, les valeurs du CDA présentaient une augmentation significative chez les patients atteints de schizophrénie. On a établi une corrélation inverse significative entre l’âge et les volumes thalamiques dans les 2 groupes et une corrélation positive avec les CDA postérieurs chez les patients souffrant de schizophrénie. On n’a signalé aucune association significative entre les variables cliniques et le volume de l’un ou l’autre côté du thalamus ou encore les valeurs du CDA.

Conclusion : On a établi que l’intégrité de la microstructure était nettement altérée et que les dimensions du thalamus étaient préservées en partie chez les patients atteints de schizophrénie. On peut donc affirmer qu’il existe de légères anomalies structurales du thalamus dans la schizophrénie, même si les volumes ne changent pas. Cette situation s’explique peut-être par une rupture au niveau de la cytoarchitecture, qui expliquerait en bout de ligne un problème de connexion cortico-thalamique. Dans d’autres études fondées sur l’imagerie, il faudra étudier plus à fond la cohérence du tissu du thalamus et son rôle dans les problèmes cognitifs chez les patients à haut risque de schizophrénie et chez les personnes apparentées au premier degré.


Medical subject headings: psychotic disorders; magnetic resonance; neurosciences.

Competing interests: None declared.

Submitted Jul. 2, 2007; Revised Nov. 2, 2007; Jan. 10, 2008; Accepted Jan. 11, 2008

Contributors: Drs. Agarwal, Pozzi Mucelli, Tansella and Brambilla designed the study. Mr. Rambaldelli and Drs. Perlini, Bellani, Cerini, Isola, Versace and Gasparini acquired the data. Drs. Dusi, Kitis, Balestrieri and Brambilla analyzed the data. Drs. Agarwal and Brambilla wrote the article. Mr. Rambaldelli and Drs. Perlini, Dusi, Kitis, Bellani, Cerini, Isola, Versace, Balestrieri, Gasparini, Pozzi Mucelli, Tansella and Brambilla reviewed the article. All authors gave final approval for publication.

Acknowledgements: Preliminary findings of this work were presented at the 60th Society of Biological Psychiatry Meeting; 2004 April 29–May 1; New York (NY). This work was partly supported by grants from the American Psychiatric Institute for Research and Education (APIRE Young Minds in Psychiatry Award), the Italian Ministry for Education, University and Research (PRIN n. 2005068874), the Veneto StartCup 2007 to Dr. Brambilla and a grant from Regione Veneto, Italy, (159/03, DGRV n. 4087).

Correspondence to: Dr. P. Brambilla, Dipartimento di Patologia e Medicina Clinica e Sperimentale, Cattedra di Psichiatria, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Udine, Via Colugna 50, 33100 Udine, Italy; fax 39-0432-54.5526; paolo.brambilla@uniud.it