Osteoprotegerin levels in patients with severe mental disorders

Osteoprotegerin levels in patients with severe mental disorders

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J Psychiatry Neurosci 2010; 35(5): 304-310

Sigrun Hope, MD; Ingrid Melle, MD, PhD; Pål Aukrust, MD, PhD;
Ingrid Agartz, MD, PhD; Steinar Lorentzen, MD, PhD; Nils Eiel Steen, MD;
Srdjan Djurovic, PhD; Thor Ueland, PhD; Ole A. Andreassen, MD, PhD

Hope — Department of Psychiatry, Østfold Hospital, Fredrikstad; Hope, Melle, Agartz, Lorentzen, Steen, Djurovic, Andreassen — Institute of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo; Melle, Djurovic, Andreassen — Department of Psychiatry, Oslo University Hospital, Ullevål; Aukrust, Ueland — Research Institute of Internal Medicine and Section of Clinical Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet; Aukrust, Ueland — Rikshospitalet Faculty Section, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo; Agartz — Department of Psychiatric Research, Diakonhjemmet Hospital; Lorentzen, Steen —
Department of Psychiatry, Oslo University Hospital, Aker; Ueland — Department of Endocrinology, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway

Abstract

Background: Severe mental disorders are associated with elevated levels of inflammatory markers. In the present study, we investigated whether osteoprotegerin (OPG), a member of the tumour necrosis factor receptor family involved in calcification and inflammation, is elevated in patients with severe mental disorders.

Methods: We measured the plasma levels of OPG in patients with severe mental disorders (n = 312; 125 with bipolar disorder and 187 with schizophrenia) and healthy volunteers (n = 239).

Results: We measured the plasma levels of OPG in patients with severe mental disorders (n = 312; 125 with bipolar disorder and 187 with schizophrenia) and healthy volunteers (n = 239).

Limitations: Owing to the cross-sectional design, it is difficult to determine causality.

Conclusion: Owing to the cross-sectional design, it is difficult to determine causality.


Submitted July 21, 2009; Revised Dec. 23, 2009, Mar. 30, 2010; Accepted Mar. 30, 2010.

Acknowledgments: The study was supported by a grant to the Thematic Organized Psychosis study group from the University of Oslo, the Research Council of Norway (no. 167153/V50, no. 163070/V50) and the South-East Norway Health Authority (no. 2004-123, no. 2007-050).

Competing interests: None declared.

Contributors: Drs. Hope, Melle and Andreassen conceived the study and its design and acquired and analyzed the data. Drs. Aukrust and Ueland contributed to the study conception and the analysis and interpretation of data. Drs. Agartz, Eiel Steen, Djurovic and Lorentzen contributed to data acquisition. Drs. Hope and Andreassen wrote the manuscript, which was reviewed by all other authors. All authors approved the final version submitted for publication.

DOI: 10.1503/jpn.090088

Correspondence to: Dr. S. Hope, Institute of Psychiatry, University of Oslo Bldg. 49, Oslo University Hospital — Ulleval, Kirkeveien 166, N-0407 Oslo, Norway; sigrun.hope@medisin.uio.no