Complementary diffusion tensor imaging study of the corpus callosum in patients with first-episode and chronic schizophrenia

Complementary diffusion tensor imaging study of the corpus callosum in patients with first-episode and chronic schizophrenia

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J Psychiatry Neurosci 2011;36(2):120-5

Xiangjuan Kong, MD;* Xuan Ouyang, MD;* Haojuan Tao, MD;* Haihong Liu, MD, PhD; Li Li, MD; Jingping Zhao, MD, PhD; Zhimin Xue, MD, PhD; Fei Wang, MD, PhD; Shaoai Jiang, MD; Baoci Shan, MD, PhD; Zhening Liu MD, PhD

Kong, Ouyang, Tao, H. Liu, Li, Zhao, Xue, Jiang, Z. Liu — The Institute of Mental Health, Second Xiangya Hospital of Central South University, Changsha, China; Kong — Jining Psychiatric Hospital, Jining, China; Wang — Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Conn.; Shan — Key Laboratory of Nuclear Analysis Techniques, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China

Abstract

Background: Abnormalities in the corpus callosum have long been implicated in schizophrenia. Previous diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies in patients with different durations of schizophrenia yielded inconsistent results. By comparing patients with different durations of schizophrenia, we investigated if white matter abnormalities of the corpus callosum emerge at an early stage in the illness or result from pathological progression.

Methods: We recruited patients with first-episode schizophrenia, patients with chronic schizophrenia and age-, sex- and handedness-matched healthy controls. We used 2 DTI techniques (voxel-based and fibre-tracking DTI) to investigate differences in corpus callosum integrity among the 3 groups.

Results: With both DTI techniques, significantly decreased fractional anisotropy values were identified in the genu of corpus callosum in patients with chronic schizophrenia, but not first-episode schizophrenia, compared with healthy controls.

Limitations: This study was cross-sectional, and the sample size was relatively small.

Conclusion: Abnormalities in the genu of the corpus callosum might be a progressive process in schizophrenia, perhaps related to disease severity and prognosis.


Acknowledgments: The authors gratefully acknowledge Zhong He from the Department of Radiology of Second Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, for his assistance in image acquisition.

Competing interests: The authors were supported by research grants from the National Natural Science Foundation of China (30670752, Zhening Liu), the National Basic Research Program of China (2006CB500808 and 2007CB512300), the 11th Five Year Key Program for Science and Technology Development of China (2007BAI17B05) and National Institution of Health (K01MH086621, Fei Wang).

Contributors: Drs. Kong, Zhao, Xue, Jiang and Z. Liu designed the study. Drs. Kong, Ouyang, Tao, H. Liu and Li acquired the data, which Drs. Kong, Ouyang, Tao, H. Liu, Li, Wang and Shan analyzed. Drs. Kong, Ouyang, Wang and Z. Liu wrote the article, which Drs. Tao, H. Liu, Li, Zhao, Xue, Wang, Jiang, Shan and Z. Liu critically reviewed. All authors approved publication of the article.

DOI: 10.1503/jpn.100041

Correspondence to: Dr. Zhening Liu (zningl@163.com) or Dr. Shaoai Jiang (shaoaij@hotmail.com), Institute of Mental Health, Second Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, 410011 China; Dr. Baoci Shan (shanbc@ihep.ac.cn), Key Laboratory of Nuclear Analysis Techniques, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100049 China