Emotion recognition and experience in Huntington disease: a voxel-based morphometry study

Emotion recognition and experience in Huntington disease: a voxel-based morphometry study

PDF

J Psychiatry Neurosci 2011;36(6):383-90

Rottraut Ille, MSc, PhD; Axel Schäfer, ScD; Wilfried Scharmüller, MSc; Christian Enzinger, MD; Helmuth Schöggl, MD; Hans-Peter Kapfhammer, MD, PhD; Anne Schienle, ScD

Ille, Schäfer, Scharmüller, Schienle — Department of Clinical Psychology, University of Graz, Austria; Enzinger — Department of Neurology, Medical University of Graz, Austria; Schöggl, Kapfhammer — Department of Psychiatry, Medical University of Graz, Austria

Abstract

Background: The neuroanatomic basis of affective processing deficits in Huntington disease is insufficiently understood. We investigated whether Huntington disease–related deficits in emotion recognition and experience are associated with specific changes in grey matter volume.

Method: We assessed grey matter volume in symptomatic patients with Huntington disease and healthy controls using voxel-based morphometry, and we correlated regional grey matter volume with participants’ affective ratings.

Results: We enrolled 18 patients with Huntington disease and 18 healthy controls in our study. Patients with Huntington disease showed normal affective experience but impaired recognition of negative emotions (disgust, anger, sadness). The patients perceived the emotions as less intense and made more classification errors than controls. These deficits were correlated with regional atrophy in emotion-relevant areas (insula, orbitofrontal cortex) and in memory-relevant areas (dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, hippocampus).

Limitations: Our study was limited by the small sample size and the resulting modest statistical power relative to the number of tests.

Conclusion: Our study sheds new light on the importance of a cognitive–affective brain circuit involved in the affect recognition impairment in patients with Huntington disease.


Submitted Sept. 7. 10, 2010; Revised Jan. 11, Feb. 21, 2011; Accepted Feb. 22, 2011.

Acknowledgments: This study was supported by the Austrian Science Fund (FWF), project number P20779-B02.

Competing interests: See above for Drs. Ille, Schäfer and Schienle and Mr. Scharmüller. None declared for Drs. Enzinger, Schöggl and Kapfhammer.

Contributors: See above for Drs. Ille, Schäfer and Schienle and Mr. Scharmüller. None declared for Drs. Enzinger, Schöggl and Kapfhammer.

DOI: 10.1503/jpn.100143

Correspondence to: Dr. A. Schienle, Department of Psychology, University of Graz, Universitätsplatz 2 / III, A-8010 Graz, Austria; anne.schienle@uni-graz.at