Corpus callosum area in patients with bipolar disorder with and without psychotic features: an international multicentre study

Corpus callosum area in patients with bipolar disorder with and without psychotic features: an international multicentre study

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J Psychiatry Neurosci 2015;40(5):352-359

Samuel Sarrazin, MD; Marc-Antoine d’Albis, MD; Colm McDonald, MD, PhD; Julia Linke, PhD; Michèle Wessa, PhD; Mary Phillips, MD, PhD; Marine Delavest, MD; Louise Emsell, PhD; Amelia Versace, MD, PhD; Jorge Almeida, MD, PhD; Jean- François Mangin, PhD; Cyril Poupon, PhD; Katia Le Dudal; Claire Daban, PhD; Nora Hamdani, MD, PhD; Marion Leboyer, MD, PhD; Josselin Houenou, MD, PhD

Abstract

Background: Previous studies have reported MRI abnormalities of the corpus callosum (CC) in patients with bipolar disorder (BD), although only a few studies have directly compared callosal areas in psychotic versus nonpsychotic patients with this disorder. We sought to compare regional callosal areas in a large international multicentre sample of patients with BD and healthy controls.

Methods: We analyzed anatomic T1 MRI data of patients with BD-I and healthy controls recruited from 4 sites (France, Germany, Ireland and the United States). We obtained the mid-sagittal areas of 7 CC subregions using an automatic CC delineation. Differences in regional callosal areas between patients and controls were compared using linear mixed models (adjusting for age, sex, handedness, brain volume, history of alcohol abuse/dependence, lithium or antipsychotic medication status, symptomatic status and site) and multiple comparisons correction. We also compared regional areas of the CC between patients with BD with and without a history of psychotic features.

Results: We included 172 patients and 146 controls in our study. Patients with BD had smaller adjusted mid-sagittal CC areas than controls along the posterior body, the isthmus and the splenium of the CC. Patients with a positive history of psychotic features had greater adjusted area of the rostral CC region than those without a history of psychotic features.

Limitations: We found small to medium effect sizes, and there was no calibration technique among the sites.

Conclusion: Our results suggest that BD with psychosis is associated with a different pattern of interhemispheric connectivity than BD without psychosis and could be considered a relevant neuroimaging subtype of BD.


Submitted Sept. 10, 2014; Revised Dec. 17, 2014; Accepted Dec. 22, 2014; Early-released July 7, 2015.

Acknowledgements: We thank all participants for agreeing to enrol in this study. We also thank the personnel of the participating centers for their help with data collection. We thank David Kupfer, MD for providing logistical and administrative support to this study. We also thank George Anderson at CRC Scotland & London for English editing of this manuscript. This work was supported by public funding from the Alliance pour les Sciences de la Vie et de la Santé (ITMO Neurosciences), the French Agence Nationale pour la Recherche (ANR MNP 2008 and ANR-11-IDEX-0004-02), the German Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (SFB636/C6 and We3638/3-1), the NIMH R01 MH076971 and the National Alliance for Research on Schizophrenia and Depression.

Affiliations: From AP-HP, Hôpital H. Mondor – A. Chenevier, DHU PePSY, Pôle de Psychiatrie, Créteil, France (Sarrazin, d’Albis, Daban, Hamdani, Leboyer, Houenou); Université Paris-Est, UMR_S955, UPEC, F-94000, Créteil, France (Sarrazin, Leboyer); Fondation FondaMental, fondation de coopération scientifique, F-94000, Créteil, France (Sarrazin, d’Albis, Daban, Hamdani, Leboyer, Houenou); UNIACT, Neurospin, Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique, Centre d’études de Saclay, Gif sur Yvette (Sarrazin, d’Albis, Houenou); INSERM, U955, Equipe Psychopathologie des maladies psychiatriques, F-94000, Créteil, France (Sarrazin, d’Albis, Daban, Hamdani, Leboyer, Houenou); Clinical Science Institute, National University of Ireland, Galway, Ireland (McDonald); Institute for Psychology Johannes Gutenberg-University of Mainz, Department of Clinical Psychology and Neuropsychology, Mainz, Germany (Linke, Wessa); Department of Psychiatry, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, USA. (Phillips, Versace, Almeida); AP-HP, Hôpital Fernand Widal-Lariboisière, Service de psychiatrie, Paris, France (Delavest); Translational MRI, Department of Imaging and Pathology, KU Leuven and Radiology, University Hospitals Leuven, Belgium (Emsell); UNATI, Neurospin, Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique, Centre d’études de Saclay, Gif sur Yvette, France (Mangin); UNIRS, Neurospin, Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique, Centre d’études de Saclay, Gif sur Yvette, France (Poupon); AP-HP, Centre d’Investigation Clinique et Plateforme de Ressources Biologiques, Hôpitaux Henri Mondor, Créteil, France (Le Dudal).

Competing interests: None declared.

Contributors: S. Sarrazin, M. Delavest, J. Almeida, J.-F. Mangin, M. Leboyer and J. Houenou designed the study. S. Sarrazin, M.-A. d’Albis, C. McDonald, J. Linke, M. Wessa, M. Delavest, L. Emsell, A. Versace, J. Almeida, C. Poupon, K. Le Dudai, C. Daban, N. Hamdani and J. Houenou acquired the data, which S. Sarrazin, J. Linke, M. Wessa, M. Phillips and J. Houenou analyzed. S. Sarrazin, M. Phillips and M. Delavest wrote the article, which all authors reviewed and approved for publication.

DOI: 10.1503/jpn.140262

Correspondence to: S Sarrazin, Hôpital Henri Mondor- Albert Chenevier, Pôle de psychiatrie, 40 rue de Mesly 94000 Créteil France; sarrazinsamuel@gmail.com